Car Seat Safety Made Easy

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The National Child Passenger Safety Board is seeking a Vehicle Manufacturer representative for the 2023-2026 term of service. Interested? Applications will be accepted until Sept 30. Fill out this form to apply for a seat on the Board now. #cpsboard #boardmember #committee

Want to give back to the CPS community at the national level? The National Child Passenger Safety Board is seeking a Child Passenger Safety Advocate to represent at-risk and underserved populations. Applications will be accepted until Sept. 30. Submit an online application to join the Board. #cpsboard #boardmember #committee

Are you ready to get in the game? The National Child Passenger Safety Board is looking for the right person to serve as Child Passenger Safety Advocate. The three-year term of service begins in May 2023 and ends in May 2026. Submit an online application now.

Are you grateful for the help that a CPS Technician, Instructor or Team provides to your community? Recognize these unsung safety heroes. Nominations for 2023 National CPS Awards are open until Aug. 31. Go to cpsboard.org/awards

A few minutes of your time can be make a world of difference for a CPS Technician, Instructor or Team. Submit your nomination for the 2023 National CPS Awards today! Nominations are open until Aug. 31. Go to cpsboard.org/awards

#awards #awardwinning #cpsawards

Nominate that CPS Technician, Instructor or Team that makes you go “Wow” for a 2023 National CPS Award. Nominations are open until Aug. 31. Got to cpsboard.org/awards

#awards #awardwinning #cpsawards

Do you know a CPS Technician or Instructor who always gives 110%? Or a Team of CPS standouts? Nominate them for a 2023 National CPS Award. Nominations are open until Aug. 31. Go to cpsboard.org/awards

#awards #awardwinning #cpsawards

In 2019, 608 child passengers age 12 and younger died in motor vehicle crashes, and more than 91,000 were injured, according to NHTSA. Parents and caregivers can make a lifesaving difference by checking whether their children are properly buckled on every trip. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3M7U18f

52% of car seats inspected by Child Passenger Safety Technicians are improperly installed and/or improperly used, according to research from AAA Mountain West Group and the National Digital Car Seat Check Form team. Let’s help parents and caregivers do better! If you know the misuse data, you’ll also know what to look for at your next seat check event. Learn more/create an NDCF account: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

#PopQuiz: Does your car seat have a snug fit? Do the “inch test” to find out. A properly installed car seat shouldn’t move more than one inch front to back or side to side when pulled at the seat belt path. Get more tips and resources in the Ultimate Car Seat Guide: http://www.ultimatecarseatguide.org

Children under 13 years of age should ride in the back seat — away from the frontal air bag whenever possible. Teenagers are usually mature enough to keep their seat belt buckled and positioned correctly and are big enough for the frontal air bag to provide protection.
Learn more about the importance of proper seat belt use for teens and adults: https://bit.ly/3LiDv4e

Continuing to use a seat belt while pregnant is an excellent choice. Learn why: https://bit.ly/3JMgwOP

Don’t Get Tangled: It doesn’t take a superhero to get it right! If you have questions about harnessing your child, talk to a Child Passenger Safety Technician today! Find a Tech near you: https://cert.safekids.org/get-car-seat-checked

Don’t Chicken Out: All questions are great questions. Don’t hesitate to ask a Child Passenger Safety Technician your car seat questions today! Learn more about car seat safety and watch installation videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

What’s the best car seat? Get answers to all of your questions and watch installation videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

Are you responsible for transporting children, grandchildren, nieces or nephews and want to learn more about using car seats and boosters correctly? Take an hour and complete Car Seat Basics, a FREE e-learning: https://www.cpsboard.org/courses/car-seat-basics/

Car seats and boosters save lives, but only if they fit the child and are correctly installed. Choose a car seat based on child’s age, height, weight, developmental level, how it fits in the vehicle and your ability to use it correctly every time. And if it is your child’s favorite color or matches your vehicle, great! To learn more about keeping your passengers safe: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

How strong are you? Not strong enough. You’d need 500 pounds of restraining force to hold onto a 20-pound child when a car traveling at 25 mph comes to a sudden stop. Use an appropriate car seat, every trip.

If you need an assist sorting through the car seats available for use, check out NHTSA’s Ease of Use Ratings: https://www.nhtsa.gov/ratings

Have your car seat inspected and have one less thing to stress over. To find an inspection station near you, visit https://bit.ly/2xys3NS

Kids learn from our example. Make sure you teach them about safety from the very beginning by buckling up before every trip. DYK: 92% of children are restrained when the driver is. Only 68% of children are restrained when the driver is not buckled up.

Why not add another skill set and see how you can impact your community through child passenger safety? Become a nationally certified Child Passenger Safety Technician: https://cert.safekids.org/become-tech

TECHS: Now, it’s easier than ever to check on car seat recalls using the National Digital Check Form. Learn how to create an account, get answers to frequently asked questions and watch tutorial videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

How do car seats and seat belts protect children? Here’s the scoop!

Get answers to National Digital Check Form FAQs: https://bit.ly/3HKfbrk

What’s that old saying? Practice makes perfect! Well, that saying applies to the National Digital Check Form and all new users. Practice as much as you’d like before heading out to your next seat check event. Create a free account: carseatcheckform.org

Remember this teaching aid that CPST-I Sue Emery invented to show kids—and caregivers—the benefits of boosters and proper belt fit? Sue would teach that the weight-x-speed force on a child’s tummy is like squeezing a Twinkie—the outer cake might stay whole, but the insides are never quite the same again. Effective!

If your child is ready to use a seat belt, ensure the seat belt fits correctly: The seat belt should lie across the upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest. Remember that seat belts should never rest on the stomach area or across the face.

Learn how to create an account, get answers to frequently asked questions and watch tutorial videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

FF Seats: Car seat misuse is far too common. Double-check these points to make sure your forward-facing child is riding safely.

RF Seats: Car seat misuse is far too common. Double-check these points to make sure your rear-facing child is riding safely.

Did you know many child passenger safety technicians can meet with you virtually to discuss car seat use and installation? To find a technician near you: https://bit.ly/3jfRvkt

Learn more about car seat safety at cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety

Stop with the excuses! Buckle up — every seat, every time. Seat belts save lives.

We want to hear from you! How do you encourage caregivers to keep their child rear-facing until they reach the maximum weight or height limits of the car seat?

A booster seat raises and positions a child so the vehicle’s lap and shoulder belt fits properly. CPS Technicians can help you decide if your child should be in a backless or high-back booster.

A sure-fire way to upset your kid? Change her car seat to FF before she reaches the max height/weight limits for RF.

It’s Better with Tether: Always use a tether with a forward-facing car seat that is installed with your vehicle’s seat belt or by using lower anchors as long as it is permitted. Check the car seat manual and the vehicle owner’s manual.

Don’t Chicken Out

All questions are great questions. Don’t hesitate to ask a Child Passenger Safety Technician your car seat questions today! Learn more about car seat safety and watch installation videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

How about a booster?

Don’t make the mistake of transitioning your child out of a booster too soon. In addition to following your state’s laws, keep in mind the following:

  • Can your child keep their back against the vehicle seat without slouching?
  • Can your child keep their knees naturally bent over the edge of the vehicle seat?
  • Can your child keep their feet flat on the floor?
  • Does the lap belt lie snugly across the upper thighs, low on hips, not the stomach?
  • Does the shoulder belt lie snugly across the shoulder and chest, and not across the neck or face?

Children who have outgrown their car seat with a five-point harness will need a booster seat to fit properly in an adult seat belt. According to the CDC, booster seat use reduces the risk for serious injury by 45% for children age 4–8, when compared with seat belt use alone. Keep older children riding safely in a booster seat until they can pass this five-step test:

  1. Back rests against the vehicle seat
  2. Knees bend at the edge of the seat
  3. Lap belt is positioned on the tops of thighs
  4. Shoulder belt sits between the shoulder and neck
  5. Child can stay this way the entire trip

Remember this teaching aid that CPST-I Sue Emery invented to show kids—and caregivers—the benefits of boosters and proper belt fit? Sue would teach that the weight-x-speed force on a child’s tummy is like squeezing a Twinkie—the outer cake might stay whole, but the insides are never quite the same again. Effective!

A booster seat raises and positions a child so the vehicle’s lap and shoulder belt fits properly. CPS Technicians can help you decide if your child should be in a backless or high-back booster.

DYK? The National Child Passenger Safety Technician Certification Training now has a hybrid offering allowing for more flexibility for students completing the training. For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/3vlIUm0

Want to provide basic child passenger safety information to a group? Great news! A group delivery option is available for Car Seat Basics, an evidence-based, interactive e-learning. To register your group, email [email protected]

Looking for a free child passenger safety educational resource? Car Seat Basics is an interactive, evidence-based e-learning. Completion time is about 60 minutes. For more information, visit: https://bit.ly/3HEfz9G

Sign up your group for free e-learning: Children in Hot Cars (available in English and Spanish). Learn what we can do to keep kids safe in an around vehicles in our communities. To register you group for this evidence-based interactive heatstroke prevention training, email [email protected]

Show Some Love

Properly secure those huggable kiddos in the right seat at the right time and use the seat the right way! Learn more: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

#PopQuiz: Do you know about the Pinch Test? With the harness buckled and tightened and chest clip placed at armpit level, pinch the harness strap at your child’s shoulder. If you are unable to pinch any extra webbing, you’re good to go. Get more tips and free resources in the Ultimate Car Seat Guide: http://www.ultimatecarseatguide.org

FF Seats: Car seat misuse is far too common. Double-check these points to make sure your forward-facing child is riding safely.

A sure-fire way to upset your kid? Change her car seat to FF before she reaches the max height/weight limits for RF.

Since 1998, more than 900 children have died of vehicular heatstroke. It’s important for everyone to understand that children are more vulnerable to heatstroke and that all hot car deaths are preventable. Educate yourself and everyone you know: https://www.cpsboard.org/trainings/kids-in-hot-cars/

Educate yourself and everyone you know about the dangers of kids and hot cars with free online training from the National Safety Council: https://bit.ly/3uZq7gn

Educate yourself and everyone you know about the dangers of kids and hot cars with free online training from the National Safety Council: https://bit.ly/3uZq7gn

Educate yourself and everyone you know about the dangers of kids and hot cars with free online training from the National Safety Council: https://bit.ly/3uZq7gn

TECHS: Now, it’s easier than ever to check on car seat recalls using the National Digital Car Seat Check Form. Learn how to create an account, get answers to frequently asked questions and watch tutorial videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

Get answers to National Digital Car Seat Check Form FAQs: https://bit.ly/3HKfbrk

What’s that old saying? Practice makes perfect! Well, that saying applies to the National Digital Car Seat Check Form and all new users. Practice as much as you’d like before heading out to your next seat check event. Create a free account: carseatcheckform.org

Learn how to create a National Digital Car Seat Check Form account, get answers to frequently asked questions and watch tutorial videos: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

#PopQuiz: Does your car seat have a snug fit? Do the “inch test” to find out. A properly installed car seat shouldn’t move more than one inch front-to-back or side-to-side when pulled at the seat belt path. Get more tips and resources in the Ultimate Car Seat Guide: http://www.ultimatecarseatguide.org

RF Seats: Car seat misuse is far too common. Double-check these points to make sure your rear-facing child is riding safely.

We want to hear from you! How do you encourage caregivers to keep their child rear-facing until they reach the maximum weight or height limits of the car seat?

In 2019, 608 child passengers age 12 and younger died in motor vehicle crashes, and more than 91,000 were injured, according to NHTSA. Parents and caregivers can make a lifesaving difference by checking whether their children are properly buckled on every trip. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3M7U18f

According to NHTSA, when the driver is buckled, children are restrained 92% of the time. But when the driver is not buckled, children are restrained only 68% of the time. Buckle up, and make sure All of your passengers are buckled up too! For more information on car seats and boosters: https://ucsg.safekids.org

Kids learn from our example. Make sure you teach them about safety from the very beginning by buckling up before every trip. DYK: 92% of children are restrained when the driver is. Only 68% of children are restrained when the driver is not buckled up.

How do car seats and seat belts protect children? Here’s the scoop!

If your child is ready to use a seat belt, ensure the seat belt fits correctly: The seat belt should lie across the upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest. Remember that seat belts should never rest on the stomach area or across the face.

Stop with the excuses! Buckle up — every seat, every time. Seat belts save lives.

52% of car seats inspected by Child Passenger Safety Technicians are improperly installed and/or improperly used, according to research from AAA Mountain West Group and the National Digital Car Seat Check Form team. Let’s help parents and caregivers do better! If you know the misuse data, you’ll also know what to look for at your next seat check event. Learn more/create an NDCF account: https://www.cpsboard.org/ndcf/

Using a top tether with a forward-facing car seat can reduce forward head movement 4-6” in a crash. When installing a forward-facing car seat, attach the top tether whenever possible.

What’s THAT? A tether is a part on the car seat that is used to secure the top of a forward-facing car seat against the vehicle seat by attaching to the tether anchor in the vehicle.

Tethering a car seat can help to make the car seat more stable and can reduce the potential for head and neck injuries in a crash. Learn more: https://www.cpsboard.org/car-seat-safety/

It’s Better with Tether: Always use a tether with a forward-facing car seat that is installed with your vehicle’s seat belt or by using lower anchors as long as it is permitted. Check the car seat manual and the vehicle owner’s manual.